The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.
The underinsured motorist coverage works similarly, but it would only pay out when you get hit by someone who does have auto insurance, but your bodily injury damages that they caused are more than they carry, leaving them underinsured. Just like your bodily injury, the UMPD would pay to fix the damage to your car caused by the other driver, and you only have to pay the $250 deductible.
Traditionally, motorhomes have been very popular among baby boomers who take advantage of their retirement to travel and vacation. The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association estimates that 750,000 to one million retirees consider an RV their home. For many of these older RVers, their love of the outdoors stems from childhood camping and family trips.  
Lastly, National General has discounts that are aimed at attracting supporters and members of certain organizations. For example, active and retired General Motors employees, current employees of General Motors suppliers, such as Chevrolet, Hummer, and Pontiac, OnStar subscribers, and GM/GMAC customers are all eligible for discounts on their premiums.
Medical payments are known as goodwill, no fault type of coverage that will protect you and your passengers in the vehicle. There is no deductible to pay before it kicks in, and it pays out on a per person basis. Regardless of how reliable you think your health insurance policy is, medical payments can help out on several different levels after an accident.
While some auto insurance policies extend liability coverage for towable RVs, they are still significantly large investments, especially if your RV is financed or is a motorhome in which you live. Most RVs contain personal belongings, home essentials, and attachments, all of which require coverage beyond what’s offered in a basic car insurance policy. For this reason, RV insurance usually has comprehensive coverage plans, which covers personal injury, theft, and natural disasters in addition to liability. RV insurance providers also offer a variety of specialized coverage options.
Long story short, car accidents can happen and it always seems as though they occur at the most inconvenient of times; which is why having a good low-cost insurance company to take care of you is so important. An auto insurance policy is there to help cover the cost of the repairs to your vehicle and medical expenses in the event of an accident; helping you get your life back to normal as fast as possible while also doing our best to alleviate the stress often associated with an auto accident.
RV insurance isn’t the same thing as auto insurance, though many providers give you the option to bundle the two. But RVs have specialized concerns. To start, they can carry many more people than cars, and they cost more to repair. In addition to basic coverage, RV insurance can also offer more extensive protection, with coverage for personal belongings, emergency expenses for lodging, and higher damage rates.

Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
Farmers offers coverage for travel trailers and fifth wheel trailers in addition to RVs, as well as a special program for customers who use them as part- or full-time residences. The Stationary Travel Trailer Program offers comprehensive, liability, and medical payments coverage for customers who reside in their trailer seasonally or permanently. All of Farmers’ optional coverage options for RVs also apply for trailers. What’s more, if your trailer is towable, Farmers will insure your tow vehicle.

By law, any type of registered vehicle must be insured. Motorhomes, like cars, are required to at least have liability insurance. Travel trailers and other towable RVs, on the other hand, cannot be driven and therefore aren’t required to have insurance. Keep in mind that towable RVs, although not vehicles, are still susceptible to theft, damage from natural disasters, vandalism, and collision, so it is highly recommended for them to still have coverage.


A-MAX Auto Insurance offers Texans affordable auto insurance with a package of primary coverages, which together makes up a standard auto insurance policy. Each of these auto insurance policies has its own separate premium. There are also other add-on auto insurance policies for additional premium costs. In addition to car insurance, we also offer motorcycle insurance, insurance for other vehicles like trailers and RVs, and Mexico tourist insurance.
However, there are some circumstances where RV insurance is always required, even if it’s a towable model. For example, if you’re renting or financing your RV, both renters and lenders will want to make sure that they’ll be properly reimbursed in case of an accident or loss, and will require you to acquire an insurance policy before allowing you to take them on the road.
Admittedly, we originally approached this topic with the traditional opinion that RVs were mainly of interest to retirees, the baby boomers who enjoy spending their post-work life experiencing the great outdoors. While this segment of the population has long been the backbone of the RV industry, the new trend of working remotely while traveling is attracting much younger consumers to the RV lifestyle.
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