On average, an at-fault property damage accident will raise your premium by an average of $612 per year. Because most insurance providers will charge you for three years after an accident, this $612 increase equates to more than $1,800 in total fees. If you’re thinking of filing a claim, consider the overall cost of the claim versus what the claim would cost to pay out of pocket. Compare this $1,837 penalty — plus your deductible (if applicable) — to the out-of-pocket expense. While this is nice information to know before filing a claim, it won’t help if you’ve already filed a claim. If you have an at-fault accident on your insurance history, consider USAA or State Farm.
The most popular term life insurance option on the market, the 20 year term policy provides longer coverage than its shorter-term 10 year counterpart, though it comes with higher annual rates. These policies are usually recommended for young families who often have large debts and expenses, like mortgages and school loans, that would become extremely burdensome if the breadwinner of the family happened to die unexpectedly. Twenty years is typically long enough for the family to substantially pay down these debts and reduce the potential risk of someone else having to foot the bill should something happen. Take a look at the average cost by Rate Class below:
While JD Power-recommended companies above aren’t among the cheapest of the insurance companies we’ve examined, they might suit your needs. It’s important to think beyond price to find a comfortable middle ground between claims satisfaction and affordability. Use The Zebra’s side-by-side insurance comparisons to avoid some of the legwork involved in insurance shopping.

If you live in an area with unusual state regulations or heightened risk of weather-related claims, shopping car insurance options will be vital. Not every car insurance company offers policies in every state, which can make pricing less competitive. If you live in storm-prone states like Louisiana or Florida, you might find it harder to get a competitive rate.
In general, insurance coverage for an insured driving someone else’s vehicle is the coverage he carries for his own vehicle. The driver’s personal coverage will apply in most cases when driving a vehicle he does not own. This includes any uninsured motorist coverage he carries and the medical portions of his policy. The driver’s property damage coverage might carry over while driving another’s car as well, depending on the policy language, the respective limits of the two policies involved, and the facts. If a person drives his own vehicle without insurance, he should not expect that he is covered when driving someone else’s vehicle.
The life insurance market has shrunk by around 4% over the last ten years. Interestingly, the market shrunk after the recession then grew about 51% between 2010 and 2015, though it has since begun to drop in size again. In 2017, life insurance premiums exceeded the amount spent in four of the past five years, but still came short of levels seen in 2008 and 2015. Check out our graph below to see how the market has fluctuated in the last decade. All numbers in billions.
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Naturally, insurance companies use your driving past as an indicator of how you will drive in the future. It can be difficult to find affordable car insurance if you have a checkered driving history. While it’s very unlikely you will find an insurance company that won’t increase your premium after an at-fault accident or other violation, the degree of the rate increase will vary by company. Let’s compare rate increases for some common violations across major insurance companies.

We analyzed premiums for a variety of policies and customer profiles to determine the average cost of life insurance across a number of different policy durations. The largest influencing factors on life insurance rates are the health of the individual being insured and their age. Factors such as whether or not you smoke, and what your height-to-weight ratio are also go a long way towards determining your annual life insurance policy quotes. Individuals that smoke often pay three times the amount that similar non-smokers will have to pay in premiums. Of course, life insurance companies will look at many other factors besides health (such as your occupation and age) but factors common in pricing other insurance products, like state of residence, are often not contributing factors.


A lot goes into an auto insurance rate quote, including your ZIP code, coverage levels, marital status, annual mileage, driving history and vehicle make, year and model. In most states, your gender and credit history are also used to determine rates. And again, the reason auto insurance comparison shopping is so important is because rates between companies are different for each person, too.
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