The minimum liability requirements vary from state to state, with most requiring only $50,000 in bodily injury coverage and $25,000 in property damage. However, to make sure you’re fully covered in case of an accident, we recommend policies that provide much more than the minimum. With this in mind, providers that featured a greater selection of coverage options with higher liability limits across the board ranked higher with us.
Basic coverage — which is required by law — offers you protection for personal injuries and damages to the vehicle, but it won’t cover extras like your belongings inside. If you live in your RV full-time, it might also be a good idea to invest in additional protection that covers your housing expenses or RV replacement costs. Before shopping around, draw up a list of necessary coverage options and make sure they’re offered by your prospective provider.
A quick look at the company’s page on the Better Business Bureau shows just how satisfied consumers are with its customer service. Most insurance companies display a large amount of negative feedback online—it comes with the territory—National General, however, enjoys largely positive customer reviews and averages fewer complaints than many of its competitors. Baby Boomers highly value good customer service, and this level of satisfaction with National General can also be seen on other online review outlets.
One of Progressive’s add-on coverages includes a “disappearing deductible” option. This means that each year you don’t file a claim, Progressive will drop your rate by 25%. With this method, the company boasts that you could eventually have a $0 deductible. But it only stays this way as long as you haven’t filed a claim — if you do, your deductible will go right back up. Safeco also incentivizes safe driving with low deductibles. Safeco will reduce your collision deductible by $100 each year you don’t have a claim, but this incentive caps at $500.
Most car insurance providers will offer to include your RV as part of your auto insurance policy, as such you will get traditional car insurance coverage. This will include bodily injury and property damage liability coverage, personal injury protection, collision, comprehensive, medical payments, and uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage, which essentially protects you against accidents and physical damage while on the road. (For a more detailed explanation of coverage see below.)  

If you live in your RV full-time for more than six months of the year, Allstate will not be able to insure your RV. Because of that, Allstate is a more suitable provider for people who only use their RVs occasionally: Its policies include basic coverage, sound system coverage, personal belongings coverage, medical payment, roadside assistance, and rental reimbursement.
We evaluated each company’s track record with its customers by looking at the available complaint data on online regulatory organizations' pages and by searching for company pages on independent consumer review websites such as the Better Business Bureau. Some companies also provide unfiltered reviews on their own websites, helping to give greater insight into customer satisfaction rates.
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