For our top picks, we preferred online claim reporting capabilities (including mobile app options) for customer convenience, but we also wanted companies to offer easy access to real human support. Whether you want to have another person on the line throughout the whole process or prefer to keep things digital, a good insurance company offers you plenty of options for claims.
By law, any type of registered vehicle must be insured. Motorhomes, like cars, are required to at least have liability insurance. Travel trailers and other towable RVs, on the other hand, cannot be driven and therefore aren’t required to have insurance. Keep in mind that towable RVs, although not vehicles, are still susceptible to theft, damage from natural disasters, vandalism, and collision, so it is highly recommended for them to still have coverage.

According to the Insurance Information Institute’s table of Automobile Financial Responsibility Laws by State, 49 out of all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, require you to have some sort of liability coverage for all vehicles on the road, including RVs. The only exception to this rule is the state of New Hampshire, which has no mandatory insurance law, and only requires financial responsibility from the person at fault in a car accident.
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The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.

RV Insurance companies take these type of risk factors into account, which makes it more difficult for bus-conversion homeowners to find the best coverage. Also, buses first need to be registered as RVs with the department of motor vehicles beforehand. If not, they’re still considered commercial vehicles instead of personal, and will not qualify for RV insurance. Different states have different requirements as to what qualifies as an RV, many of which include repainting the bus a different color, having a potable water supply, installing a toilet, and having cooking appliances onboard.
Jonathan Longnecker and Greg Gerber both experienced mechanical issues with their brand new RVs, requiring frequent repairs. As a result, both bloggers suggest buying used or vintage RVs and renovating them, learning your machine’s ins and outs during the process. This way, owners can take care of repairs themselves instead of losing travel time waiting for overbooked RV service shops under their insurance policy.
The underinsured motorist coverage works similarly, but it would only pay out when you get hit by someone who does have auto insurance, but your bodily injury damages that they caused are more than they carry, leaving them underinsured. Just like your bodily injury, the UMPD would pay to fix the damage to your car caused by the other driver, and you only have to pay the $250 deductible.

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So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:


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Jonathan Longnecker and Greg Gerber both experienced mechanical issues with their brand new RVs, requiring frequent repairs. As a result, both bloggers suggest buying used or vintage RVs and renovating them, learning your machine’s ins and outs during the process. This way, owners can take care of repairs themselves instead of losing travel time waiting for overbooked RV service shops under their insurance policy.

Coverage for a wide variety of RV types may be obtained through RVInsurance.com. Class A, B, and C Motorhomes, Fifth-Wheel and Conventional Travel Trailers, Airstream Trailers, Trucks Campers, Bus Conversions, Toy Haulers, Horse Trailers, Pop-up Tent Trailers, and other specialty and custom RVs can all be covered by the company’s insurance options. The experts at RVInsurance.com are able to find insurance coverage for any kind of RV or motorhome clients might drive.
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