The company’s personal belongings coverage protects items, from laptops and linens to attachments and accessories, up to $3,000. Customer belongings are insured for what they paid and not a depreciated amount. They also have the option of adding more coverage if needed. The permanent attachments coverage works similarly, automatically ensuring any items attached—such as awnings, satellite dishes, and TV antennas—for the full amount it would cost to replace them instead of a depreciated amount.
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Regardless of how often you use your RV, Safeco is worth a look. Safeco offers coverage for anyone who lives in an RV fewer than 250 days (about eight months). While this won’t cover policyholders who live in their RV full-time, it serves as a nice middle-ground for people who only plan to store their RV away during the winter months, for instance.
Bus-home conversions are a rapidly-growing trend that several RV insurance companies are adapting into their policies. The type of bus, however, is a prominent deciding factor in coverage, since bus axles differ from traditional RVs and aren’t built to carry a certain amount of weight. Many RV insurance companies avoid school bus-converted homes, as they have a higher risk of rollover accidents. Also, your bus-converted home must be registered as a recreational vehicle for personal use to be eligible for RV-insurance. Depending on the state where you register your vehicle, it may require your bus to comply with several requirements and meet certain standards before registration. It’s important that you check with your local department of motor vehicles beforehand.

RVInsurance.com is partnered with twenty carriers known in the industry for their strong and consistent financial performance. Nationwide, the Foremost Insurance Group, National General, and Safeco Insurance are some of these carriers, to name a few. They share similar A-or-higher ratings with at least one of the large financial strength rating agencies.


Medical payments are known as goodwill, no fault type of coverage that will protect you and your passengers in the vehicle. There is no deductible to pay before it kicks in, and it pays out on a per person basis. Regardless of how reliable you think your health insurance policy is, medical payments can help out on several different levels after an accident.

A good number of quotes to compare is three. If you already know three companies whose RV insurance you are interested in, go through each of their quoting applications. Then, compare the final estimated premiums and the features of its policy: maybe company A’s policy is cheaper overall, but company B’s offers greater coverage for a slightly more expensive price.


Safeco’s coverage options include some less common offerings that may appeal to RV owners with more particular concerns. Along with Progressive, Safeco is one of the only insurers to provide pet injury insurance, along with total loss replacement for your RV in the event of an accident. On top of the original price of your RV, Safeco can also insure any custom AV equipment or decorative additions, such as a speaker system, TV, special flooring, wheels, or decals.
So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:
The company’s personal belongings coverage protects items, from laptops and linens to attachments and accessories, up to $3,000. Customer belongings are insured for what they paid and not a depreciated amount. They also have the option of adding more coverage if needed. The permanent attachments coverage works similarly, automatically ensuring any items attached—such as awnings, satellite dishes, and TV antennas—for the full amount it would cost to replace them instead of a depreciated amount.
When judging coverage and benefits, we singled out RV insurance carriers that offered extensive and flexible coverage options. To be considered for our list, companies had to provide all the traditional insurance protection, as well as a healthy amount of RV-specific options. Most RV insurers offer liability, personal injury protection (PIP), collision, underinsured or uninsured motorist, and comprehensive coverage. Other types, such as full-timer and Mexico coverage, vary in availability from company to company.
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